I just finished reading a book by a young woman I met last summer at a TeachMeet in Newcastle. Presenters at most TeachMeet are teachers (d’oh!), but at this one, Talk On The Tyne, the host Martin Bailey had threaded a theme of well-being and mental health thru the programme.

And so young Ruth Fox came to tell her story. I’ve written about my reaction, and that of the rest of those present, before. I think everyone there immediately became part of Ruth’s ‘Fox in the Box’ army.

Now I’ve read the book, it all comes back to me. This is a book for teachers and school managements to read, both scary and reassuring at the same time. Scary that such turmoil could so badly affect one so young, and reassuring to know that the kind ear of a teacher can do such good. This is Ruth’s story, but it could be about any student in any teacher’s class.

Preamble

  • Scratch is a free block-based / jigsaw programming language which allows users create interactive stories, games, and animations. https://scratch.mit.edu/
  • ScratchEd is an online community where Scratch educators share stories, exchange resources, ask questions, find people to collaborate with. http://scratched.gse.harvard.edu/
  • ScratchEd Meetups are peer-designed professional learning experiences inspired by the Edcamp model, which in turn is built on the ideas of Open Space Technology*. Basically, attendees turn up, decide what the schedule is to be, then get into it. Anyone who is interested in connecting with fellow educators and learning more about using Scratch in educational settings is welcome to participate. https://www.meetup.com/pro/scratched
  • *In Open Space events participants create and manage their own agenda of parallel working sessions around a central theme of strategic importance. The only rule is The Law of Two Feet – if at any time one feels one is neither contributing nor gaining, feel free to move to another space.  http://openspaceworld.org/wp2/what-is/

Richard Millwood, John Hegarty and me met up with the ScratchEd folk at the MIT Scratch Conference last July, and decided to give the format a go in Ireland, offering a chance for the various groups who use Scratch in schools, colleges, clubs,  dojos to swap ideas. Limerick was chosen as the first venue, as it is where Scratch had its first outing via LERO way way back in 2007.

We met as a merry gang of ten on Wed Nov 7th in Limerick Education Cantre, led by teachers from CESI, mentors from Coderdojo Ireland, software researchers from LERO, and volunteers from MakerMeetIE and joined by colleagues with expertise in designing and delivering resources and training based on Scratch programming. The learner age groups represented in the room covered the spectrum from primary to higher education, and both formal and informal education fora. Our scheduling exercise was based on this diverse wish list:

ScratchEdMeetup scheduling

ScratchEdMeetup scheduling

Our breakout sessions based on this ended up as Scratch 3.0, Progression, Physical Computing with Scratch, Cross Curricular ideas.

IMG_20181108_004713

We walked, talked and played our way thru the allocated two hours which flew past. Each of us brought something to the table – a question, an idea, a resource, a clarification – and each of us definitely went away somewhat the richer for the experience, and with plenty of food for thought, and a plan to work on.

Next instance of this meetup can take place anywhere a ¨Scratcher¨ in Ireland is wont to call a meeting; most likely bet is on one taking place at #cesicon 2nd March 2019 in Athlone.

IMG_20181013_113945

Megadojo is growing. Starting at one venue – Limerick Institute of Technology – several years ago, this year it took place in six venues: Dundalk, Maynooth, Letterkenny, Tralee, Cork as well as Limerick which has never missed a year. Megadojo is a family coding day, filled with taster workshops, showcases and discussion rooms. Volunteers from the HEA institutions local dojos, as well as invited guests, take part with very good will to help celebrate EU Code Week with as big an Irish splash as possible.

I attended the Dundalk Megdojo, which was championed by Peter Gosling and his colleagues, and hosted in the fabulous PJ Carroll building of Dundalk IT. The labs, corridors, and open spaces were filled with robots, IOT showcases, Scratch lessons, physical computing workshops. The children and parents in attendance seemed very happy with their lot. And right outside the door was the Bumbleance from our nominated charity – families could get a tour of this very special ambulance which brings very young VIP patients to and from hospital from all over Ireland.

IMG_20181014_102748

My role at Magadojo Dundalk was to moderate the panel discussion entitle “females in IT”. I was impressed with the three young women, all recent graduates of DkIT, who now work in the IT industry as software engineers, designers, and QAs. Tara, Karen and Nathalia fielded questions from the audience which was composed of local families. It was interesting to note than each of them found it very easy to find employment in their field, and thankfully none of them had as yet met any gender barriers – long may that last for them in their careers. Impressive also was the regard with which they held their DkIT CS department – many of whom were present to support the occasion. I noted the presence of the both the Head of Department and the College President, not just for the opening photographs and ceremony but right thru the day and into the discussion. There was considerable interest in and discussion of the current introduction of Computer Science into second level schools and (soon) primary schools, with the parents present wondering how to have it in “their” school. So thanks to Nathalia, Karen and Tara for stepping up and providing a terrific debate.

Update – thanks to the report published in the local newspaper and forwarded by Peter Gosling, I can give the three speakers their full names and positions – Natalia Salmanova of Prometric, Karen Aungier of Celtic Testing, and Tara McGivern of Avenade.

Screen Shot 2018-10-24 at 15.55.34

Multiply the energy and enjoyment that was palpable in Megadojo DkIT last Saturday by six, add to it the massive energy that will be released at Dojocon in Kilkenny next weekend, and top it with the week in-week out engagement at Coderdojo / Code Club events supported by Coderdojo Ireland and Coderdojo Foundation / Raspberry Pi worldwide – it is a very potent and prosocial investment in our future.

Over to you, Dojocon 2018!

Belated thoughts and thanks on last weekend’s NEARImeet in MIC, Limerick, Ireland, which was so well worth the early start and long drive there and back.

NEARI is an Action Research in Education network founded by Drs Mary Roche, Máirín Glenn, Catríona McDonagh and Bernie Sullivan which has an online forum and face to face meetings several times per year. Any researcher with an interest in reflection on their practice is welcome. Each meeting is well planned around a theme (this one was ‘integrity’) and provides the perfect mix of rich input from volunteer presenters combined with insightful audience discourse curated with the ‘light touch’ chairing (in this case by Mary Roche) that allows for interesting detours but keeps the group on point.

So as well as all the audience interaction, we were treated to six thought-enhancing inputs, from veterans and newbies alike:

  • Catriona McDonagh presented a lovely ‘prologue’ featuring the poem Integrity by Gary Dodd
  • Máirín Glenn’s thoughtful keynote set the the mood for sensitive reflection
  • Ruth Sheridan ignited the room with the passion with which outlined her final year Self Study Action Research (SSAR) project, set in the context of her very unique path to becoming a teacher
  • Bridget Flanagan updated us on her PhD research, and her reflections on her experience to date (at pilot stage) prompted a debate on the value teachers place (or not) on discussing shared values in the school
  • Colette Saunders told us of the Masters by Research she is undertaking in Sligo IT, situated in the world of those who study Early Childhood Education. This was an eye-opener and a study we will all follow with keen interest as Colette progresses.
  • Róisín O’Leary outlined her final year SSAR, and explained how it was helping her in her first year of teaching now. Her conclusion that she herself was a variable in her AR was key, food for thought for the more experienced teachers in the room.

Thank you to all six of you, and the others whose questions and conversation was really thought provoking and helpful. Special extra thanks to Ruth – sharing the car journey together from Ballinasloe and back was an experience not to be forgotten, and one to be repeated hopefully!

For date and venue of next #NEARImeet, keep an eye on the website calendar at NEARI events


 

 

Earlier in the year a message was sent to Wikispaces users that they would be closing down. Now if you look for the original Irish TeachMeet wiki, set up almost a decade ago, this is what you are greeted with…

Screen Shot 2018-08-28 at 13.41.47.png

In order to keep as much information safely intact as possible, the site contents were wrapped up in a zip file (attached below) – it is not tidy, rather like one of those cupboards you open to have all the contents land on your head and spill on the floor – but it is all there (in two formats, zip files attached below). The three main elements from the “old” wiki have each been reproduced as a page on the “new” wiki

  • a Welcome / Fáilte page with overview and instructions
  • calendar of TeachMeets in Ireland
  • the list of volunteers who have organised TeachMeets in Ireland since 2009

PBworks may prove to be as temporary a home as wikispaces was but hopefully it will do for now, and some bright spark will work out a better way to carve a comfortable space in which to settle. The main thing is that this one is open to anyone in Ireland who wishes to access, use, and develop it.

Head on over to irishteachmeet.pbworks.com and have a look…if you are having a TeachMeet, sign in and add the details.Screen Shot 2018-08-28 at 14.44.04.png

[So it turns out a virtual house mouse can be as nerve wracking as a real house move. Having done one of each this summer, I’ll be happy to stay put in both instances for as long as possible. For the virtual move, big thanks are due to Richard Millwood and John Hegarty for wisdom, help, and advice. For the fact that the wiki exists in the first place, serious eternal thanks are due to John Heffernan – once a historian, always a historian.]

HTML archive zip file for Irish TeachMeet Wikispace 2009-2018 irishteachmeet_20180531-HTML

PDF file for Irish TeachMeet Wikispace 2009-2018 irishteachmeet_20180531

Screen Shot 2018-08-28 at 11.02.31One (and a half!) of the most enjoyable and memorable hours at the Scratch conference earlier this summer in MIT was the workshop to showcase ScratchEd Meetup. Attendees were not leactured about ScratchEd Meetup; we were welcomed by Karen Brennan, Alexa Kutler and the team, and launched straight into a typical event scenario which prompted several “I want one of these” moments. Best part was hearing from those from the worldwide network who have hosted meetups in their area – Leanna from Kentucky, Pau from Barcelona, Simon from Tanzania.

ScratchEd has long been an online forum wherein educators who use Scratch can convence. From this has recently evolved the ScratchEd Meetup, an occasional or regular face to face catch up session described as a “participatory professional learning experience”, organised with a Open Space / Barcamp / Edcamp flavour.

Ireland has so many users of Scratch in dojos, code clubs and classrooms around the country, it is a fair bet that many teachers and mentors would enjoy participating in a ScratchEd Meetup (especially topical with the background chatter about Scratch3.0). Plans are currently being incubated, so do keep an eye on the website at www.cesi.ie, the @cesitweets Twitter feed (and probably #ScratchEdMeetupsIE, though it is a bit of a hashtag handful) for details of time, place, and sign up.


SCRATCHedMEETUPS manifesto:

DeoVAiDWsAEEzVq.jpg

For some background reading on the genesis of this peer designed participative professional learning, see this 2012 article by Karen Brennan and her colleagues: http://web.media.mit.edu/~kbrennan/files/Brennan_ScratchEd_Meetups.pdf

tmScratchMITIt was nano presentations all the way at the TeachMeet proposed by Drew Buddie for the 2018 Scratch conference at the Media Lab in MIT, Cambridge, USA. We got an end-of-the-day time slot, and a cool dark space (with super duper AV facilities) called The Cube.

As we’d all had a long long day attending, presenting, and workshopping at the main conference, all presentations were ‘nano’ in nature – short, sweet and kept to the point. Presenters from all over the world volunteered to share out their wisdom – USA (Mildred, Kathleen, Shawn), Africa (Max – Kenya, Rehema – Tanzania, Justin – South Africa, John – Nigeria), Europe (England – Andy & Richard, Ireland – Mags, Scotland – Drew & Rob, Austria – Matt, Netherlands – Hans), South America (Brazil – Ana). There was a ‘use tech well for the good of all’ thread running thru the evenings presentations.

Drew was MC; Russel Tarr’s trusty classtools.net Wheel Of Fortune determined the order in which our thirteen speakers took the stage; me and The Dromedary of Doom were (almost totally redundant) timekeepers; Richard and John were on-call  ‘technoroadies’.

classtools.net random name picker

classtools.net random name picker

There was a whole new zero hour aspect to this TeachMeet, which was a delightful as it was surprising. Although some speakers had signed up in advance in answer to an online invite, others signed up from the floor as the TeachMeet was in progress – by email or by sharing me a link to their presentation. Lightning speed internet reliability – connectivity ftw!

The regrettably missing portion in this TeachMeet was some built in conversation time, but the clock and our collective tiredness worked against us in this instance. However, judging by the responsive atmosphere as the presentations rolled along, I think it is fair to say the occasion wasn’t diminished in any great way by this omission.

Thanks Drew for prompting this, the third of hopefully many consecutive TeachMeets at Scratch.

Rehemma from Tanzania represents She Codes For Change

Rehemma from Tanzania represents She Codes For Change

See Twitter timeline for this TeachMeet at #tmScratchMIT

%d bloggers like this: